No. 23 EQUALITY : LIGHT & UNDERSTANDING CANDLE
No. 23 EQUALITY : LIGHT & UNDERSTANDING CANDLE
No. 23 EQUALITY : LIGHT & UNDERSTANDING CANDLE
No. 23 EQUALITY : LIGHT & UNDERSTANDING CANDLE
No. 23 EQUALITY : LIGHT & UNDERSTANDING CANDLE

No. 23 EQUALITY : LIGHT & UNDERSTANDING CANDLE

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When asked to create a custom order for summer interns at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, it was a welcome focus during this time. The name:  EQUALITY took on a deeper meaning as Brooklyn continues to be a center of driving change. Why the number 23? The Equal Rights Amendment was first introduced in 1923. 

NOTES:
Top: Eucalyptus, Amaretto, Saffron
Middle: Bergamot, Cypress, Sandalwood
Bottom: Dark Musk, Rum, Smoke and Amber

This rich blend is here to usher in new season of hope. When I posted about this special project you wonderful clients messaged me wanting to know what does EQUALITY smell like? It's refreshing, layered, and a little bit of fire in it and I decided this was how I could help beyond attending protests and supporting friends. There are layers to this blend - different and some you may not think go together that are truly a harmonious mix. 

As a young business, this is my vehicle to be able to donate. Thank you for making that possible with this candle. Donations have included Bad Ass Brooklyn, Act Blue, French Bulldog Village, Australian Red Cross, and The Trevor Project. 

As a New Yorker, half Chinese, for February 2021 10% of proceeds will be donated to Welcome to Chinatown, to help local businesses. The last year has been very hard on the Asian community.

Actors Daniel Dae Kim & Daniel Wu offered $25,000 to lead to the arrest of the man who assaulted an as a reward for information regarding the January 31 assault of a 91-year-old man in Oakland’s Chinatown, following two similar incidents also targeting elderly Asian residents. “The number of hate crimes against Asian Americans continues to skyrocket, despite our repeated pleas for help,” the Hawaii Five-O actor posted to Instagram Friday, along with video of the assault. “The crimes are too often ignored and even excused. Remember #VincentChin. Remember"

When I launched this business in August 2019, I was advised not to show myself because no one wanted to see a mixed race woman. And during Phase One I was both physically and verbally assaulted at my local Post Office, who took no action after logging the complaint. I was even refused service and changed to using UPS, subsidizing the price differences (now USPS is more) in order not to avoid that volatile environment.

If you've read this far, this cause is close to my heart. Many elders in the community have been attacked and hiding out for over a year as a result of the pandemic. Thank you for embracing empathy and standing up with the Asian community.